Call for Papers

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Storytelling is an essential part of human history and culture, a powerful tool for learning, sense making and knowledge transmission. A tale may be a narrative account of an event, asserted fact, or circumstance; a cautionary fable used to educate; a boast of one’s accomplishments. At its most basic level, stories comprise a succession of events, and storytelling is the activity of relaying those events through personal communication or artefacts such as movies, novels, reports. Increasingly, our tales are encoded, distributed, appreciated and preserved in digital media: the emails, texts, tweets and status updates that comprise our everyday stories.

We construct narratives around and through the information products and applications we use on a daily basis. As researchers, we attempt to capture these stories in order to inform the design, evaluation, and use of information systems and resources, As library and information professionals, we use stories to understand and engage our communities in our services and organizations.

Our conference theme, Tales from the Edge: Narrative Voices in Information Research and Practice, reflects both the geographic location of our host city, Victoria, British Columbia, as well as our intention to showcase leading edge research and practice. As narrative is critical to the development of meaning, delegates to the conference are encouraged to surface their subjectivities and give voice not only to their users or participants, but to themselves. Each scholar has a unique story to tell the Information Science field and profession. Our theme supports diverse approaches to inquiry, and seeks to recognize not only research that pushes the boundaries of the field, but also those voices residing at the margins of research and practice.

We seek papers and presentations that address this broad theme, but also pose the following questions for consideration:

  • How is technology affecting the way we analyze personal and social narratives?
  • What methods do we use to capture our users’ and participants’ stories?
  • How can we better represent marginalized voices in our research?
  • What new techniques allow us to tell stories with data?
  • How do we use narrative to bridge the divide between research and practice?
  • What is the researcher’s role as raconteur?
We welcome studies that explore any of these issues, or analyses that more broadly address the theme of narrative at the boundaries.

Call for proposals: We welcome proposals for CAIS/ACSI 2013. Proposals may be submitted in English or French. The conference committee strongly encourages submissions from professional and academic researchers.